Decision Points: Facts, Feelings & Your Health

Decision Points help you navigate personal health decisions

Everyone deals with tough decisions in their own way. Decision Points are interactive tools that help you to weigh your health care options. They were recently introduced in the Bon Secours Orthopaedic Institute pages.

Created by health educators and reviewed by board-certified physicians, Decision Points tools are provided to Bon Secours by Healthwise, a national healthcare information publisher. You’ll find them in the health information pages of bonsecourshamptonroads.com. These tools address a wide range of health issues;  medical tests, medicines and surgeries.

Each assessment tool presents the benefit, the risks, and the costs of your opting yes or no. It also factors in how you feel about the health issue.

Each Decision Point tool leads you through a quick, six-step learning session. The six steps of the process take as long to complete as it might to read a brief magazine article.

  1. Get the Facts
  2. Compare Options
  3. (rate) Your Feelings
  4. Your Decision
  5. Quiz Yourself (are you sure?)
  6. Your Summary  (“use this to talk with your doctor or loved ones about your decision.” )

One of the toughest health decisions many patients face is whether to have a surgery or not – or, when to have a surgery that the patient agrees with their doctor is necessary.

Surgery today is very different from what it was even twenty years ago. Surgeries, generally, are “less disruptive,” minimally invasive,…” due to new technologies. Very complicated procedures yield good results with impressively shorter recovery times.

Though complications for most healthy patients are very rare, surgeries do carry risks. Some patients may inflate the risk to the point where they fear the surgery more than they fear what will happen if they don’t have it.

Patients may be tempted to delay needed procedures in order to take advantage of paid leave schedules, the family calendar (“I’ll wait until after our daughter’s wedding.”), or even, to ride out bump at work (“tax season!”).

A certain amount of avoidance is natural. Feeling unsure is natural. Decision Points give patients sound medical information – and ultimately, the confidence – to do what is right for their health.

Speak Your Mind