Mapping the Human Heart

Electro-anatomical mapping allows physicians to avoid invasive procedures, and patients experience a faster return to normal activity.

Bon Secours Heart and Vascular Institute Dr. Ryan Seutter cardiac care irregular heart beat treatments

Ryan Seutter, MD, of Cardiovascular Specialists

Heart failure patients can sometimes require a procedure called electro-anatomical mapping – known as heart mapping. The heart mapping technique was used to identify and treat abnormal rhythms in the heart, but advances over the last 10 years have enabled physicians to map the heart’s natural rhythms and provide new treatments.

“Heart mapping technology is used to eradicate abnormal tissue so normal rhythm remains,” said Ryan Seutter, MD, a cardiologist who specializes in electrophysiology at the Bon Secours Heart & Vascular Institute. “The procedure allows us to avoid invasive procedures, and patients experience a faster return to normal activity.”

The procedure is usually conducted in an electrophysiology lab. The patient lies on a table next to an X-ray and mapping machine, which shows where the catheter is inserted through a vein in the heart. When the catheter reaches the area where the electrical signals are irregular, the physician heats up the catheter tip to cauterize or remove the abnormal tissue.

“The procedure is very successful, curing 80 to 100 percent of abnormal rhythms, and the chance of an abnormal rhythm recurring is minimal,” said Dr. Seutter.

Call 889-CARE for more information about the Bon Secours Heart & Vascular Institute.

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